Monthly Archives: March 2019

when to put down your pet

From NYT:

To help pet owners make decisions about end-of-life care, Dr. Villalobos developed a decision tool based on seven indicators. The scale is often called the HHHHHMM scale, based on the first letter of each indicator. On a scale of zero to 10, with zero being very poor and 10 being best, a pet owner is asked to rate the following:

  • Hurt: Is the pet’s pain successfully managed? Is it breathing with ease or distress?

  • Hunger: Is the pet eating enough? Does hand-feeding help?

  • Hydration: Is the patient dehydrated?

  • Hygiene: Is the pet able to stay clean? Is it suffering from bed sores?

  • Happiness: Does the pet express joy and interest?

  • Mobility: Can the patient get up without assistance? Is it stumbling?

  • More: Does your pet have more good days than bad? Is a healthy human-animal bond still possible?

Dr. Villalobos says pet owners should talk to their vet about the ways they can improve a pet’s life in each category. When pet owners approach end of life this way, they often are surprised at how much they can do to improve a pet’s quality of life, she said.

[Try Dr. Villalobos’s scale: Assess Your Pet: Is It Time to Say Goodbye?]

By revisiting the scale frequently, pet owners can better assess the quality of the pet’s hospice care and gauge an animal’s decline. The goal should be to keep the total at 35 or higher. And as the numbers begin to decline below 35, the scale can be used to help a pet owner make a final decision about euthanasia.

 

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On saturated fats

Here’s a great podcast from Dr. Mike Roizen of the Cleveland Clinic, and the transcript is there too:

https://www.healthandwealthresearch.com/fab-9-supplements-call

It is focused on supplements, but includes this important detail about diet:

…food with carnitine, that is red meat and, yes, pork is a red meat, and lecithin, and choline such as egg yolks and cheese, in specific configurations seems to, and does, change the bacteria inside you over a period of as short as one week. And the good news is if you get rid of those foods totally, within one week, your bacteria changes back to healthy bacteria inside you. But when you have, for example, two six ounce steaks in a week, the bacteria that love that steak predominate, and those bacteria produce as their waste product from the carnitine—so it doesn’t matter whether it’s grass fed or not—but they produce from the carnitine an inflammatory substance that is called butyl butane and trimethylamine. The trimethylamine goes to the liver and creates trimethylamine oxide, which ends up causing inflammation and is a more powerful inflammatory agent and cause of heart disease, stroke, and memory loss than is in fact the LDL cholesterol 260. So there isn’t a physician who wouldn’t treat that. You probably should avoid more than four ounces of red meat or an egg yolk or cheese a week.

 

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