Monthly Archives: May 2017

ESG vs. Returns

Great post from Asness regarding ESG.  The bottom line is, if you are trying to encourage good behavior, you should expect that your goals do not come free of charge – there should be a cost to total returns.

Pursuing virtue should hurt expected returns. Some have discussed this fact. But, it’s still not widely understood or broadly accepted. This seems to arise from investment managers selling virtue as a free lunch, and from investors who very much want to believe in that story. In particular, and my focus here, accepting a lower expected return is not just an unfortunate ancillary consequence to ESG investing, it’s precisely the point (though its necessity may indeed be unfortunate). As an ESG investor this lower expected return is exactly what you want to happen and really the only way you can effect the change you seek

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Fed Balance Sheet unwind

Michael Arone at SPDR Blog has added a bunch of global data to the info I posted previously regarding the Fed’s balance sheet.  He includes some information about current and future levels of required reinvestments (maturity dates) but really doesn’t touch on how equity markets might be impacted.

There are a bunch of cool charts (and one really, really dumb one, click on the link and you figure out which one).

Here’s a couple:

growth_in_global_central_bank_assets_1160x760

us_treasuries_and_china_fx_reserves_1160x687

 

Importantly, he noted that the Chinese sale of treasuries was related to their desire to control the level of the yuan, not some general panic over US Treasuries, as that action is often portrayed.

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Filed under Financial, Government, Uncategorized